Богатство и нищета: вид сверху

1403 просмотров

Различия между жизнью богатых и бедных иногда особенно хорошо видны сверху. Проект фотографа Джонни Миллера “Unequal Scenes” — это серия аэрофотоснимков, показывающих результаты пятидесяти лет апартеида в Южной Африке.

MANDATORY CREDIT: Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Editorial use only. Only for use in context of 'Unequal Scenes' photo project. Please link to website if possible: www.unequalscenes.com. Strictly no stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission Mandatory Credit: Photo by Johnny Miller/Millefoto/REX/Shutterstock (5733931v) Sandton is the economic capital of Southern Africa. The Johannesburg Stock Exchange is located there, as well as headquarters for most financial firms in SA. Just across the highway (literally, across the road) is the township of Alexandra - a crime-infested urban warren of shacks, hostels (basically large communal dwellings once used for mine workers), and home to hundreds of thousands of black Africans. Neighbouring Sandton is very white Unequal Scenes: Segregation of urban spaces in South Africa - 2016 FULL COPY: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/sgkr A photographer has captured a stark view of the urban economic segregation in South Africa. Johnny Miller has used drone technology to take an aerial view of the divide in standards of living between the poor and the wealthy. His work highlights how the manicured suburbs of the middle classes sit only several hundred metres away from the ramshackle shanty towns of the poorest members of society. An example include a God's-eye view of the picturesque suburbs looking out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away.
Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. 
Sandton. Здесь расположена фондовая биржа Йоханнесбурга, а также штаб-квартиры большинства финансовых корпораций Южной Африки; это район почти поголовно с белым населением. И всего лишь через дорогу находится округ Александра — кишащий преступниками лабиринт лачуг и хостелов (бывшие общежития шахтеров), где обитают сотни тысяч черных жителей Африки.
MANDATORY CREDIT: Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Editorial use only. Only for use in context of 'Unequal Scenes' photo project. Please link to website if possible: www.unequalscenes.com. Strictly no stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission Mandatory Credit: Photo by Johnny Miller/Millefoto/REX/Shutterstock (5733931p) Vusimuzi / Mooifontein Cemetery. Vusimuzi settlement lies between a fetid stream, a huge cemetery, and two slightly wealthier suburbs. There are over 30,000 people living in approximately 8,500 shacks. High above the shacks, high-tension power lines carry electricity to other areas of Johannesburg, but not Vusimuzi Unequal Scenes: Segregation of urban spaces in South Africa - 2016 FULL COPY: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/sgkr A photographer has captured a stark view of the urban economic segregation in South Africa. Johnny Miller has used drone technology to take an aerial view of the divide in standards of living between the poor and the wealthy. His work highlights how the manicured suburbs of the middle classes sit only several hundred metres away from the ramshackle shanty towns of the poorest members of society. An example include a God's-eye view of the picturesque suburbs looking out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away.
Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. 
Vusimuzi / Mooifontein Cemetery. Вусимузи — это поселение возле зловонной речушки и огромным кладбищем. Совсем нищие лачуги соседствуют с чуть более «успешными» постройками. Высоко над этими лачугами парит высоковольтная ЛЭП, несущая энергию в другие районы Йоханнесбурга, но только не в Вусимузи.

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Editorial use only. Only for use in context of 'Unequal Scenes' photo project. Please link to website if possible: www.unequalscenes.com. Strictly no stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission Mandatory Credit: Photo by Johnny Miller/Millefoto/REX/Shutterstock (5733931a) Nomzamo/Lwandle is a township bordered by the communities of Strand and Somerset West, about 40km east of Cape Town. Originally it was conceived of as an area to house ?single male workers? during the apartheid years, in a type of accommodation known as ?hostels?.  It is now a sizable suburb with a population of over 60,000 people,  In 2014 the City of Cape Town forcibly removed many people from their shacks along the N2 highway in a violent confrontation, but then soon changed course, and rebuilt some of the shacks on another plot of land. There is a clear land buffer (supplemented with fencing) separating the wealthier housing of Strand from Nomzamo/Lwandle. Many of the rebuilt shacks exist within this land buffer Unequal Scenes: Segregation of urban spaces in South Africa - 2016 FULL COPY: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/sgkr A photographer has captured a stark view of the urban economic segregation in South Africa. Johnny Miller has used drone technology to take an aerial view of the divide in standards of living between the poor and the wealthy. His work highlights how the manicured suburbs of the middle classes sit only several hundred metres away from the ramshackle shanty towns of the poorest members of society. An example include a God's-eye view of the picturesque suburbs looking out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away.
Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. 
Nomzamo/Lwandle — это городок в 40 км от Кейптауна. Изначально он задумывался в годы апартеида как место, где в общежитиях будут жить холостые мужчины-работники. Сегодня это внушительного размера район с населением более 60 тысяч человек. В 2014 году власти решили насильно переселить отсюда бедняков, однако столкнулись с решительным сопротивлением. Вместо уже снесенных лачуг построили новые в буферной зоне, которая на фотографии отделяет нищий район от более престижного Strand, в котором живут состоятельные люди.

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Editorial use only. Only for use in context of 'Unequal Scenes' photo project. Please link to website if possible: www.unequalscenes.com. Strictly no stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission Mandatory Credit: Photo by Johnny Miller/Millefoto/REX/Shutterstock (5733931o) Kya Sands / Bloubosrand. Among leafy trees, shady street corners and swimming pools, you find the middle-class suburb of Bloubosrand. A quick search on Property24 shows that many houses are worth over 1 million rand. Across the street, tin shacks with car tires on their roof extend into the distance. If you look even closer, the main thoroughfares in Kya Sands are actually drainages for the black, filthy water emanating from the nearby creek Unequal Scenes: Segregation of urban spaces in South Africa - 2016 FULL COPY: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/sgkr A photographer has captured a stark view of the urban economic segregation in South Africa. Johnny Miller has used drone technology to take an aerial view of the divide in standards of living between the poor and the wealthy. His work highlights how the manicured suburbs of the middle classes sit only several hundred metres away from the ramshackle shanty towns of the poorest members of society. An example include a God's-eye view of the picturesque suburbs looking out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away.
Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. 
Kya Sands / Bloubosrand. Разлапистые деревья, тенистые уголки и прохладные бассейны — все это зажиточный пригород Bloubosrand. Многие дома здесь стоят более 1 млн ранд (это почти 70 тысяч долларов). Но всего лишь через дорогу можно увидеть жестяные лачуги с резиновыми покрышками наверху — это район Kya Sands. Если присмотреться к нему поближе, то можно увидеть, что главные улицы здесь — это просто сток грязной, черной воды.

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Editorial use only. Only for use in context of 'Unequal Scenes' photo project. Please link to website if possible: www.unequalscenes.com. Strictly no stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission Mandatory Credit: Photo by Johnny Miller/Millefoto/REX/Shutterstock (5733931b) Masiphumelele / Lake Michelle. Picturesque suburbs look out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away. There is no police station, only one small day clinic, and it?s estimated that up to 35% of the population is infected with HIV or TB Unequal Scenes: Segregation of urban spaces in South Africa - 2016 FULL COPY: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/sgkr A photographer has captured a stark view of the urban economic segregation in South Africa. Johnny Miller has used drone technology to take an aerial view of the divide in standards of living between the poor and the wealthy. His work highlights how the manicured suburbs of the middle classes sit only several hundred metres away from the ramshackle shanty towns of the poorest members of society. An example include a God's-eye view of the picturesque suburbs looking out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away.
Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. 
Masiphumelele / Lake Michelle. Живописный пригород с видом на озеро Lake Michelle, в 20 км от центра Кейптауна. Небольшой участок заболоченных земель, забор и охрана — и вот вы уже в районе, где живет 38 тысяч бедняков. В нем нет ни одного полицейского участка и лишь один небольшой фельдшерский пункт: примерно 35% населения здесь заражены ВИЧ или туберкулезом.
MANDATORY CREDIT: Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Editorial use only. Only for use in context of 'Unequal Scenes' photo project. Please link to website if possible: www.unequalscenes.com. Strictly no stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission Mandatory Credit: Photo by Johnny Miller/Millefoto/REX/Shutterstock (5733931c) Hout Bay / Imizamo Yethu. Hout Bay is a picturesque valley about 15km south of Cape Town. Nestled between two affluent housing estates is the suburb of Imizamo Yethu, comprised of both a designated housing area and an ?informal settlement? area, which is largely comprised of small tin-roof shack dwellings which stretch up the steep slopes of the mountain behind it. The most striking thing is the number of trees in Tierboskloof (the richer estate), versus the almost treeless Imizamo Yethu Unequal Scenes: Segregation of urban spaces in South Africa - 2016 FULL COPY: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/sgkr A photographer has captured a stark view of the urban economic segregation in South Africa. Johnny Miller has used drone technology to take an aerial view of the divide in standards of living between the poor and the wealthy. His work highlights how the manicured suburbs of the middle classes sit only several hundred metres away from the ramshackle shanty towns of the poorest members of society. An example include a God's-eye view of the picturesque suburbs looking out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away.
Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. 
Hout Bay / Imizamo Yethu. Hout Bay — живописная долина в 15 км на юг от Кейптауна.

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Editorial use only. Only for use in context of 'Unequal Scenes' photo project. Please link to website if possible: www.unequalscenes.com. Strictly no stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission Mandatory Credit: Photo by Johnny Miller/Millefoto/REX/Shutterstock (5733931e) Vukuzenzele / Sweet Home. Sweet Home in Cape Town was primarily a dumping ground for builder?s rubble like bricks, which are still being recycled today near the south end of the settlement. Services and conditions are poor. Vukuzenzele, just to the north, was developed in collaboration with a fund to provide affordable housing to South Africans. The visual difference between the two is stark Unequal Scenes: Segregation of urban spaces in South Africa - 2016 FULL COPY: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/sgkr A photographer has captured a stark view of the urban economic segregation in South Africa. Johnny Miller has used drone technology to take an aerial view of the divide in standards of living between the poor and the wealthy. His work highlights how the manicured suburbs of the middle classes sit only several hundred metres away from the ramshackle shanty towns of the poorest members of society. An example include a God's-eye view of the picturesque suburbs looking out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away.
Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Vukuzenzele / Sweet Home.

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Editorial use only. Only for use in context of 'Unequal Scenes' photo project. Please link to website if possible: www.unequalscenes.com. Strictly no stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission Mandatory Credit: Photo by Johnny Miller/Millefoto/REX/Shutterstock (5733931w) Sandton is the economic capital of Southern Africa. The Johannesburg Stock Exchange is located there, as well as headquarters for most financial firms in SA. Just across the highway (literally, across the road) is the township of Alexandra - a crime-infested urban warren of shacks, hostels (basically large communal dwellings once used for mine workers), and home to hundreds of thousands of black Africans. Neighbouring Sandton is very white Unequal Scenes: Segregation of urban spaces in South Africa - 2016 FULL COPY: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/sgkr A photographer has captured a stark view of the urban economic segregation in South Africa. Johnny Miller has used drone technology to take an aerial view of the divide in standards of living between the poor and the wealthy. His work highlights how the manicured suburbs of the middle classes sit only several hundred metres away from the ramshackle shanty towns of the poorest members of society. An example include a God's-eye view of the picturesque suburbs looking out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away.
Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Sandton

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock. Editorial use only. Only for use in context of 'Unequal Scenes' photo project. Please link to website if possible: www.unequalscenes.com. Strictly no stock, books, advertising or merchandising without photographer's permission Mandatory Credit: Photo by Johnny Miller/Millefoto/REX/Shutterstock (5733931k) Manenberg / Phola Park, Cape Town Unequal Scenes: Segregation of urban spaces in South Africa - 2016 FULL COPY: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/sgkr A photographer has captured a stark view of the urban economic segregation in South Africa. Johnny Miller has used drone technology to take an aerial view of the divide in standards of living between the poor and the wealthy. His work highlights how the manicured suburbs of the middle classes sit only several hundred metres away from the ramshackle shanty towns of the poorest members of society. An example include a God's-eye view of the picturesque suburbs looking out onto the glistening waters of Lake Michelle, 20km from Cape Town?s city centre. Separated by wetlands, a guard house and an electrified fence, the 38,000 inhabitants of the neighbouring tin shacks of Masiphumelele are a world away.
Johnny Miller/Millefoto/Rex Shutterstock.  Manenberg / Phola Park, Cape Town.

© PORTULAN.RU, HUFFINGTON POST